La ville de Paris organise le dimanche 25 septembre une nouvelle journée “Paris sans voiture”, sur fond de polémiques autour de la fermeture des voies sur berges. La Tribune et le site El País Planeta Futuro publient à cette occasion un manifeste d’experts urbains pour démontrer que des villes où l’on respire, c’est possible !

carlos moreno paris sans voiture


Our liveable and car-free cities

A new edition of «Paris with no cars » will be held next September, 25th.

A wide area of the town will be closed to the car traffic and the banks will thus be made available to the citizens.

We want to tackle with the issue of the city and the cars, in the light of our works as international experts that we are.

Present on the five continents, we are interested in understanding the dynamic which lies in the world urban development, the growth of cities, the paradigm shift, and how they face today the demands of the urban life, in particular in the field of mobility.

A flurry of reports has been mounting up over the last years on the urban health, and the link with the air pollution, and especially, fine particulates linked to the car traffic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has created on a world basis, a databank on the atmospheric urban pollution.

The WHO has been able to compare the levels of the small particulates and the fine particulate matters (MP10 and MP2,5) in 795 cities among 67 countries on a five years period (2008-2013).

With its update in 2016, the WHO points out that the air pollution in the urban areas continues to make progress at an alarming pace, with devastating effects on the human health. More than 80% of the people living in the urban zones where the air pollution is watched, are exposed to levels of air quality which do not respect the limits set out.

As the world’s cities grow as an epicentre of human activity, it leads us to be confronted to an urban transformation where what is at stake is more than just a public health issue.

We are facing a crucial challenge of urban choices which is quite « embodied » and visible today.
Our action as experts is to help make our cities fight against air pollution in a systemic way, for the re appropriation of the town by the pedestrians, so that the water and the biodiversity should be put forward as sources and places of living, so that the citizen and social dynamic expresses itself in the public spaces, which will therefore be comforted and enlarged, saving space owing to the closing of the urban motorways and the pushing away of cars from our urban centers.

It is a question of being equal to the challenges of this century, in order to reinvent life in our cities, again find one’s specific identity, help make them more polycentric, breathable, liveable, fluid, and imagine other kinds of housing, working, moving and feeling the city.

Already today, the town where we walk, the city of the shared bikes and electric cars, or the aerial city with the cable metro, or with bus-boats are becoming familiar to us.

Other modes will come with the implementation of the buses on demand, and the new modes of transportation with the electrical urban shuttles, the cars without drivers, and other ways of moving using the advanced technologies in every field, such as the materials, energy, chemistry, the internet of things, the big data, etc…

On this century of the Cities, of the global cities, a major effort is necessary so that the entire urban ecosystem takes part with creativity and involvement to the transformation of our cities, to make them more liveable and more lively.

In each of our city, we can witness the efforts that are being undertaken in that sense. While sharing those examples throughout the world, we want to assert that this issue is a world issue, and that we can bring solutions to build an urban future, where the quality of life will be the focal point:

Auckland
Auckland, City of Cars is undergoing an urban revolution. Its waterfront has been unlocked for people, total public transport patronage has increased 140% since 1994 (Rail up by 1,200%) and its car clogged streets are being transformed into a vibrant laneway circuit of shared spaces where businesses are flourishing with a 440% uplift in retail hospitality takings and the pedestrian is King!
Ludo Campbell-Reid, City Design Champion Auckland

Barcelona
Barcelona has stimulated historically the use of the public transport, which today is intensified by the orthogonal network of buses. Betting on the intensive use of the bicycle and the innovative project of the « superblocks », which minimizes the use of the car and promotes the citizen utilisation of the public space.
Pilar Conesa, CEO Anteverti and Smarty City Expo World Congress curator, et Boyd Cohen, Professor of Entrepreneurship & Sustainabilty, EADA Business School

Guangzhou
Megacity Guangzhou’s daily public transport ridership is one the highest in the world, almost carrying the entire population of Sweden on daily basis. 
It’s BRT and bike sharing programme is one the largest in the world, focusing on eliminating ‘car dependencies’ in one of the fastest growing cities of the world.
Karuna Gopal, President of the Foundation for Futuristic Cities India

Hyderabad
To decongest the traffic, the State government has planned various projects to improve public transportation: Hyderabad Metro Rail and Hyderabad Bicycling Club. For last mile connectivity, Hyderabad Bicycling Club (HBC), Hyderabad Metro Rail (HMR) and UN Habitat entered into a tripartite MoU to provide first and last mile connectivity to Metro passengers: about 10,000 bicycles including e-bikes would be made available at 300 Bike Stations. 63 bike stations will be at Metro stations, while the rest will be the ‘feeder stations’ spread all over Hyderabad.
Hyderabad, Guangzhou Institute for Urban Innovation (GIUI)

Malmö
The City of Malmö’s Traffic and mobility plan describes how a holistic planning approach can achieve improved quality of life for more of Malmö´s residents, visitors and other stakeholders. The plan takes a grasp on planning and clarifies how the work should progress towards a more functionally mixed, dense, green and short distance city.
Christer Larsson, Director of City Planning Malö

Medellin
In Medellín, “the People’s way” and multimodal mobility are the priority today.
We have rediscovered the value of walking and living together.
Our cities won’t operate better, neither won’t be more functional, sustainable, equitable, competitive, healthy, nor happy, as long as there are cars.
“The People’s way” is crucial for public life.
Jorge Perez Jaramillo, Architect, former chief planner for Medellin

Paris
Paris is developing an ambitious program in order to apply the agreements of the COP 21. The closing of the urban motorways on the banks of the Seine, the reclaiming of the city by the pedestrians, the redevelopment of the public squares and of the urban bathing water areas, the enhancement of nature and of biodiversity, the Champs-Elysées given back to pedestrians once a month, all of which are concrete examples of this commitment. Paris is a great world Capital, and a pioneer city in the intensive use of sharing bikes and electric cars.
Carlos Moreno, Professor, Smart City expert and the Mayor of Paris’ Special Envoy for Smart Cities

Port Saint Louis
Mauritius, as an emerging African country. For millennia cities have been the driver for politics, and so is the case for Port Louis, which finds itself at a crossroad in history, between political and societal change. We witness a daily shift of hundreds of thousands of people and with over 100 yearly deaths linked to car accidents, solving the issue of cars will be primordial for a healthy Mauritius.
Gaëtan Siew, CEO Global Creative Leadership Initiative, former President of the International Union of Architects, et Zaheer Allam, Urbaniste Global Creative Leadership Initiative

Quito
On the eve of the UN Habitat III Conference in Quito, the issue of a city with no cars must be raised globally. In Quito, there has been for almost a decade an effort in diminishing the private car in the streets through several policies trending towards the strengthening of public transportation. Is it stunning that only 20% of the trips are made in private cars while the cars occupy more than 80% of the streets. There is a project to eliminate cars in the Historic Center of the town that should be implemented.
Germanico Pinto, President Corporación Ciudad Smart Quito, former Minister of Ecuador

Sydney
There’s new kind of ‘reclaim’ happening in Sydney, connecting urban experiences, city’s vast treasures of urban heritage and equitable increase in local economies. 
Sydney’s ‘Walking City’ phenomenon aspires to present reflections of ‘right to city’ and people focused economy, society and culture.
Sunil Dubey, Senior Advisor Metropolis World Association

Vancouver
Like many leading cities around the world, Vancouver is re-prioritizing our streets and places for people rather than for cars. This isn’t a “war on the car,” it’s a fight for a better city for ALL! When we make walking, biking and transit delightful, taking up less space and costing less public money to move more people, it works better for everyone, INCLUDING drivers!
Brent Toderian, Urbanist & City Planner, former chief planner for Vancouver

Global Perspective
Technological determinists would have us believe that the future of transport in cities will be highly efficient and autonomous passenger vehicles shuttling citizens and visitors throughout the city with car-share models. In fact, this future is being tested by Uber in Pittsburgh in the US as we speak. As you can see from the discussion of car free (or at least freer) cities above, our bet is that the future of mobility in cities is a focus on people, not technology, and that we actually must go “back to the future” when streets were treated as a commons prioritizing pedestrians and cyclists. This transition will take bold leadership of city councils and a smart citizenry who must demand, and participate in a car-free future for our cities.

Une nouvelle édition de « Paris sans voitures » aura lieu le 25 septembre prochain.

Un vaste périmètre de la ville sera fermé à la circulation automobile et les voies seront ainsi mises à disposition des citadins.

Nous voulons aborder la problématique de la ville et des voitures, à la lumière de nos travaux en tant qu’experts internationaux que nous sommes.

Présents sur les 5 continents, nous nous intéressons à comprendre la dynamique du développement urbain dans le monde, la croissance des villes, le changement de paradigme et la manière comme celles-ci font face aujourd’hui aux exigences de la vie urbaine, en particulier en ce qui concerne la mobilité.

Les rapports concernant la santé urbaine et le lien avec la pollution de l’air et en particulier les particules fines, liés au trafic automobile, se multiplient depuis de nombreuses années dans le monde.

Au niveau mondial, l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS) a créé une base de données sur la pollution atmosphérique urbaine.

L’OMS a pu comparer les niveaux de petites particules et de particules fines (MP10 et MP2,5) dans 795 villes de 67 pays sur une période de 5 ans (2008-2013).

Avec sa mise à jour en 2016, l’OMS signale que la pollution atmosphérique en milieu urbain continue de progresser à un rythme alarmant, avec des effets dévastateurs pour la santé humaine.

Plus de 80% des gens vivant dans des zones urbaines où la pollution atmosphérique est surveillée, sont exposés à des niveaux de qualité de l’air ne respectant pas les limites fixées.

Le poids des villes dans le monde comme épicentre de l’activité humaine nous amène à être confrontés à une mutation urbaine, où se joue bien plus qu’un problème de santé publique.

Nous sommes face à un enjeu profond de choix urbains incarné et visible aujourd’hui.

Notre engagement comme experts est de contribuer à ce que nos villes luttent de manière systémique contre la pollution de l’air, pour la ré appropriation de la ville par les piétons, pour que l’eau et la biodiversité soient mises en avant comme sources et lieux de vie, pour que la dynamique citoyenne et sociale s’exprime dans les espaces publics, qui seront confortés et agrandis, y compris en gagnant de la place par la fermeture des autoroutes urbaines aux voitures, et en repoussant les voitures de nos centres-ville.

Il s’agit aussi d’être à la hauteur de défis qui se posent en ce siècle pour réinventer la vie dans nos villes, retrouver son identité, contribuer à les rendre plus polycentriques, respirables, vivables, fluides et d’imaginer d’autres modes d’y habiter, de travailler, de se déplacer et de sentir la ville.

Déjà aujourd’hui la ville où l’on marche, celle des vélos et des voitures électriques partagés, ou aérienne avec le métro câble, ou en bateau bus, toutes ces villes nous sont familières.

D’autres sont à venir avec la mise en place de bus à la demande et de nouveaux modes de transport avec les navettes électriques urbaines autonomes, les voitures sans conducteur et d’autres manières de se déplacer en utilisant les avancées technologiques dans tous les domaines, tels les matériaux, l’énergie, la chimie, l’Internet des objets, le big data… etc.

Au siècle des villes, des villes – monde, un effort majeur nous est indispensable pour que tout l’éco système urbain participe avec créativité, et engagement à la transformation de nos villes, pour les rendre vivables et vivantes.

Dans chacune de nos villes, nous pouvons témoigner d’efforts dans ce sens. En partageant ces exemples au travers le monde, nous voulons montrer que cette problématique est mondiale et que nous pouvons apporter des solutions pour construire un futur urbain où la qualité de vie sera au centre des préoccupations.

Auckland
Auckland, ville de voitures, subit une révolution urbaine. Son bord de mer a été ouvert pour les gens, la totalité du parrainage de transport public a augmenté de 140% depuis 1994 (le Rail en hausse de 1.200%) et ses rues bouchées par les voitures sont en train d’être transformées en un circuit vivant de ruelles composées d’espaces partagés où les entreprises fleurissent avec une augmentation significative de 440% dans les recettes en hôtellerie-restauration et vente au détail, et le piéton est Roi !
Ludo Campbell-Reid, City Design Champion Auckland

Barcelone
Historiquement, Barcelone a stimulé l’utilisation du transport public, qui est aujourd’hui intensifié par le réseau orthogonal de bus. Le pari sur l’utilisation intensive de la bicyclette et le projet novateur “des superblocs “, qui minimise l’utilisation de la voiture et promeut l’utilisation de l’espace public par le citoyen.
Pilar Conesa, CEO Anteverti and Smarty City Expo World Congress curator, et Boyd Cohen, Professor of Entrepreneurship & Sustainabilty, EADA Business School

Guangzhou
La fréquentation quotidienne des transports publics dans la mégalopole de Guangzhou est une des plus dense au monde, transportant quasiment la population entière de la Suède en une seule journée. Son système de Bus à la demande (BRT Bus Rapid Transit) et le programme de partage de vélo font partie des plus importants au monde, se concentrant sur l’élimination des “dépendances à la voiture” dans l’une des villes au monde connaissant la croissance la plus rapide.
Karuna Gopal, President of the Foundation for Futuristic Cities India

Hyderabad
Pour décongestionner le trafic, le gouvernement de l’État a planifié divers projets pour améliorer les transports en commun : le Métro Rail de Hyderabad et le Club de Cyclisme de Hyderabad. Pour la connectivité du dernier kilomètre, le Club de Cyclisme d’ Hyderabad (HBC), le Métro d’Hyderabad (HMR) et UN Habitat ont conclu un protocole d’accord tripartite pour assurer aux passagers du Métro, la connectivité du premier et du dernier kilomètre : environ 10,000 bicyclettes incluant des e-vélos seraient rendues disponibles dans 300 Stations de Vélo. 63 stations de vélo seront accessibles aux stations de Métro, le reste constituera des stations d’approvisionnement réparties un peu partout dans Hyderabad.
Hyderabad, Guangzhou Institute for Urban Innovation (GIUI)

Malmö
Le plan de la circulation et de la mobilité de la Ville de Malmö rend compte comment une approche de planification holistique peut réaliser une amélioration de la qualité de la vie pour la plupart des résidents, des visiteurs et des autres acteurs de Malmö. Le plan se saisit de la planification et clarifie comment le travail devrait progresser vers une ville de courte distance plus fonctionnellement mixte, dense et verte.
Christer Larsson, Director of City Planning Malö

Medellin
À Medellín, “À la manière des Gens”, la vie citoyenne et la mobilité multimodale sont les priorités aujourd’hui. Nous avons redécouvert la valeur de la marche à pied et du vivre ensemble. Nos villes ne fonctionneront pas mieux, ne seront pas plus fonctionnelles, durables, équitables, compétitives, saines et heureuses, tant qu’il y aura des voitures. “À la manière des Gens”, voilà une notion qui est capitale pour la vie publique et le bien vivre en ville.
Jorge Perez Jaramillo, Architect, former chief planner for Medellin

Paris
Paris développe un programme ambitieux pour appliquer les accords de la COP21. La fermeture des autoroutes urbaines au bord de la Seine, la réappropriation de la ville par les piétons, le réaménagement des places publiques et la mise en valeur de la nature et de la biodiversité, ainsi que des zones de baignade urbaines, les Champs-Élysée rendus aux piétons une fois par mois, sont autant d’exemples concrets de cet engagement. Paris est une grande capitale mondiale pionnière dans l’utilisation intensive de vélos et des voitures électriques partagées.
Carlos Moreno, Professor, Smart City expert and the Mayor of Paris’ Special Envoy for Smart Cities

Port Saint Louis
L’Ile Maurice, comme un pays africain naissant. Depuis des millénaires, les villes ont joué un rôle moteur dans les politiques, et c’est le cas pour Port-Louis, qui se trouve à un carrefour de son l’histoire, entre changement politique et changement sociétal. Nous sommes témoins d’un déplacement quotidien de centaines de milliers de personnes, et de plus de 100 morts par an, liés aux accidents de la route. Résoudre la question des voitures sera primordial pour une Ile Maurice saine.
Gaëtan Siew, CEO Global Creative Leadership Initiative, former President of the International Union of Architects, et Zaheer Allam, Urbaniste Global Creative Leadership Initiative

Quito
À la veille de la Conférence de L’ONU Habitat III à Quito, la question d’une ville sans voitures doit être posée de façon globale. À Quito, il y a eu pendant presque une décennie un effort pour faire diminuer la voiture personnelle dans les rues par plusieurs politiques avec une tendance vers le renforcement des transports en commun. Il est stupéfiant que seulement 20% des trajets soient faits en voitures privées alors que les voitures occupent plus de 80 % des rues. Il y a un projet pour éliminer les voitures dans le Centre Historique de la ville qui devrait être mise en oeuvre.
Germanico Pinto, President Corporación Ciudad Smart Quito, former Minister of Ecuador

Sydney
Il y a une nouvelle sorte de ‘revendication’ à l’heure actuelle à Sydney, qui relie les expériences urbaines, les immenses trésors d’héritage urbain, et l’augmentation équitable dans les économies locales. Le phénomène de la “Ville de la Marche à pied” à Sydney” aspire à exposer des réflexions sur le “droit à la ville ” et à révéler des gens attentifs à l’économie, la société et la culture.
Sunil Dubey, Senior Advisor Metropolis World Association

Vancouver
Comme beaucoup de grandes villes dans le monde entier, Vancouver est en train de donner la priorité à nos rues et à nos lieux, pour les habitants plutôt que pour des voitures. Ce n’est pas “une guerre contre la voiture,” c’est un combat pour une meilleure ville pour TOUS ! Quand nous faisons de la marche à pied, du vélo et que les modes d’accès sont plus fluides, qu’ils prennent moins d’espace et moins d’argent public pour permettre à plus de personnes de se déplacer, ça “marche” mieux pour tout le monde, y compris pour les conducteurs !
Brent Toderian, Urbanist & City Planner, former chief planner for Vancouver

Perspectives globales
Certains déterministes technologiques nous feraient croire que l’avenir des transports dans les villes passera par des véhicules ultra efficaces et autonomes, des services de navettes transportant des citoyens et des visiteurs partout dans la ville sur le modèle de l’auto partage. En fait, cet avenir est en train d’être testé par Uber à Pittsburgh aux EU en ce moment même. Comme vous pouvez le voir dans cette discussion sur les villes sans voiture (ou avec une présence automobile réduite), nous parions que l’avenir de la mobilité dans les villes réside dans le recentrage sur les gens, et non sur la technologie et que nous devons en réalité effectuer un “retour vers le futur ” quand les rues étaient envisagées comme des espaces communs donnant la priorité aux piétons et aux cyclistes. Cette transition devra faire preuve de vrai leadership via les conseils municipaux et la citoyenneté intelligente qui doit exiger et participer à un avenir sans voiture pour nos villes.


Nuestras ciudades habitables y libres de coches

Un gran esfuerzo es necesario para que todo el ecosistema urbano tome parte con creatividad y compromiso en la transformación de las ciudades, para hacerlas más habitables y más vivas

Una nueva edición de la “Paris sin coches” tendrá lugar el próximo 25 de septiembre.

Una amplia área de la ciudad permanecerá cerrada al tráfico rodado y las riberas del río estarán disponibles para los ciudadanos.

Queremos abordar el tema de la ciudad y los coches, bajo la luz de nuestros trabajos como expertos internacionales que somos.

Presentes en los cinco continentes, estamos interesados en comprender la dinámica que subyace en el desarrollo del mundo urbano, en el crecimiento de las ciudades, en el cambio de paradigma y cómo hacen frente a las necesidades de la vida urbana, particularmente en el campo de la movilidad.

Numerosos informes han sido producidos en los últimos años sobre la salud urbana y el vínculo con la polución del aire, y especialmente, con las partículas finas relacionadas con el tráfico automotor.

La Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) ha creado a escala mundial, una base de datos de la contaminación atmosférica urbana.

La OMS ha podido comparar los niveles de pequeñas y finas partículas (PM10 y PM2,5) en 795 ciudades de 67 países en un período de cinco años (2008-2013).

Con la actualización de 2016, la OMS apunta que la contaminación del aire en áreas urbanas continúa progresando a un paso alarmante, con efectos devastadores sobre la salud humana. Más del 80% de la población que vive en zonas urbanas, donde la polución del aire se vigila, están expuestos a niveles de calidad del aire que no respetan los límites establecidos.

Tal y como las ciudades crecen, como el epicentro de la actividad humana, esto nos lleva a confrontar la transformación urbana donde lo que está en juego es mucho más que sólo la salud pública.

Estamos enfrentan un desafío crucial de encrucijadas urbanas que se encarnan y son visibles hoy en día en nuestro quehacer cotidiano. Nuestra acción como expertos es ayudar a las ciudades a luchar contra la polución del aire de forma sistémica, para la re-apropiación de la ciudad por los peatones, por que el agua y la biodiversidad sean priorizados como fuentes y lugares de vida, para que el ciudadano y las dinámicas sociales se expresen en los espacios públicos, para que estos sean mejorados y agrandados, incluyendo el espacio provenniente de lo que ahora pertenece a las autopistas urbanas y alejando así a los coches de los centros urbanos.

Es una cuestión de ser equitativo frente a los desafíos de este siglo, para reinventar la vida en nuestras ciudades, encontrar de nuevo una identidad específica, ayudar a hacerlas más policéntricas, respirables, vivibles, fluidas e imaginar otros tipos de habitabilidad, trabajo, movilidad y sentimiento de la ciudad.

Ya hoy en día, la ciudad por la que caminamos, la ciudad de las bicis y los coches eléctricos compartidos, o de la ciudad aérea del funicular o los barcos-bus se están haciendo familiares para nosotros.

Otros modos llegarán con la implementación de los autobuses bajo demanda, y los nuevos medios de transporte, con los transbordadores urbanos eléctricos, los coches sin conductor, y otras formas de moverse utilizando tecnologías avanzadas en todos los campos, como el de los materiales, la energía, la química, el internet de las cosas, el Big Data, etc.

En este siglo de las Ciudades, el de las ciudades globales, un gran esfuerzo es necesario para que todo el ecosistema urbano tome parte con creatividad y compromiso en la transformación de las ciudades, para hacerlas más habitables y más vivas.

En cada una de nuestras ciudades, podemos ser testigos de los esfuerzos que se están realizando en ese sentido. Al mismo tiempo que compartiendo los ejemplos a lo largo del mundo, queremos reivindicar que este tema es mundial, y que podemos aportar soluciones donde estemos para construir un futuro urbano, donde la calidad de vida sea el aspecto principal.

Auckland
En Auckland, la Ciudad de los Coches, es una revolución urbana que está en marcha. Su línea de costa ha sido desbloqueada para la gente, el total de usuarios del transporte público ha aumentado un 140% desde 1994 (el tren un 1.200%) y las calles construidas para los coches se están transformando en un circuito de espacios públicos donde los negocios están floreciendo con un crecimiento del 440% del consumo en la hostelería y donde el peatón es el rey!
Ludo Campbell-Reid, City Design Champion Auckland

Barcelona
Barcelona ha estimulado históricamente el uso del transporte público, lo cual se identifica todavía hoy por la red ortogonal de autobuses. Apostando por un uso intensivo de la bicicleta y por el innovador proyecto de las “superbloques”, que minimizan el uso del coche y promocionan el uso del espacio público por parte de los ciudadanos.
Pilar Conesa, CEO Anteverti and Smarty City Expo World Congress curator, et Boyd Cohen, Professor of Entrepreneurship & Sustainabilty, EADA Business School

Guangzhou
El uso diario del transporte público en la mega ciudad de Guangzhou es uno de los más altos del mundo, hasta el punto de desplazar a una población equivalente a la de Suecia de forma diaria. Su “Bus Rapid Transit” y programa de bicis compartidas es uno de los más grandes del mundo, focalizándose en eliminar la dependencia del coche en una de las ciudades que más rápidamente crecen en el mundo.
Karuna Gopal, President of the Foundation for Futuristic Cities India

Hyderabad
Para descongestionar el tráfico, el Gobierno del Estado ha planeado varios proyectos para mejorar el transporte público: Hyderabad Metro Rail y el Hyderabad Bycicling Club. Para la conectividad de la última milla, el HBC el HMR y UN Habitat han llegado a un acuerdo para proveer a los pasajeros del metro la conectividad de la primera y última milla: cerca de 10.000 bicicletas incluyendo e-bikes estarán disponibles en cerca de 300 estaciones de bicis. 63 de ellas estarán en las estaciones de metro, mientras que las restantes serán las “estaciones de alimentación” extendidas por toda Hyderabad.
Hyderabad, Guangzhou Institute for Urban Innovation (GIUI)

Malmo
El tráfico y el plan de movilidad de la ciudad de Malmo describen cómo una aproximación holística puede conseguir una calidad de vida mejor para la mayoría de los residentes, visitantes y otros actores urbanos de Malmo. El plan se basa en la planificación y clarifica cómo el trabajo debe progresar hacía una ciudad con usos mixtos, densa, verde y con distancias cortas.
Christer Larsson, Director of City Planning Malö

Medellín
En Medellin “el camino de la gente” y la movilidad multimodal son la prioridad a día de hoy. Hemos redescubierto el valor de caminar y vivir juntos. Nuestras ciudades no funcionarán mejor, ni serán más funcionales, sostenibles, equitativas, competitivas, sanas o felices mientras haya coches. “El camino de la gente” es crucial para la vida pública.
Jorge Perez Jaramillo, Architect, former chief planner for Medellin

Paris
Paris está desarrollando un ambicioso programa para cumplir con los acuerdos de la COP21. El cierre de las autopistas urbanas en las riberas del Sena, la reapropiación de la ciudad para los peatones, el re-desarrollo de las plazas públicas asi las zonas públicas de baño en los canales, la mejora de naturaleza y la biodiversidad, los Campos Elíseos devueltos a los peatones una vez al mes, todos ellos son ejemplos de este compromiso. Paris es una gran capital mundial, y una ciudad pionera en el uso de bicicletas compartidas y coches eléctricos.
Carlos Moreno, Professor, Smart City expert and the Mayor of Paris’ Special Envoy for Smart Cities

Puerto Luis
Mauricio, es un país africano emergente. Durante milenios, las ciudades han sido el motor de la política y éste es el caso de Puerto Luis, que se encuentra en una encrucijada de la historia, entre un cambio político y social. A diario somos testigos del cambio de cientos y miles de personas con 100 muertes al año relacionadas con accidentes de tráfico, por lo que solventar el asunto de los coches sería primordial para una Mauricio Sana.
Gaëtan Siew, CEO Global Creative Leadership Initiative, former President of the International Union of Architects, et Zaheer Allam, Urbaniste Global Creative Leadership Initiative

Quito
En la víspera de la III Conferencia UN Habitat que tendrá lugar en Quito, el tema de la ciudad sin coches debe elevarse globalmente. En Quito, ha habido un esfuerzo durante al menos una década para disminuir el uso del coche privado en las calles a través de muchas políticas tendentes a mejorar el transporte público. Es sorprendente que sólo el 20% de los desplazamientos se hagan en coches privados mientras que los coches ocupan el 80% de las calles. Hay un proyecto para eliminar los coches del Centro Histórico de la ciudad que debería ser implementado.
Germanico Pinto, President Corporación Ciudad Smart Quito, former Minister of Ecuador

Sydney
Hay un nuevo tipo de “reclamo” que se está dando en Sydney, conectando las experiencias urbanas, los vastos tesoros de la herencia urbana y un crecimiento equitativo de las economías locales. El fenómeno de la “Ciudad Caminable” de Sydney aspira a presentar reflexiones sobre “el derecho a la ciudad” y la economía, sociedad y cultura centradas en la gente.
Sunil Dubey, Senior Advisor Metropolis World Association

Vancouver
Como muchas ciudades líderes alrededor del mundo, Vancouver está re-priorizando sus calles y plazas para la gente en lugar de los coches. No se trata de una “guerra contra el coche”, es una lucha por una ciudad mejor para TODOS! Cuando hacemos el caminar, el ir en bici y el tránsito en general algo delicioso, ocupando menos espacio y costando menos dinero público para mover más gente, es algo que funciona para todo el mundo, INCLUSO para los conductores.
Brent Toderian, Urbanist & City Planner, former chief planner for Vancouver

Perspectiva global
Los deterministas tecnológicos nos hubiesen hecho creer que el futuro del transporte en las ciudades estaría en vehículos autónomos de pasajeros, muy eficientes, que transportarían ciudadanos y visitantes por toda la ciudad en modelos de car-sharing. De hecho, este futuro está siendo puesto a prueba por Uber en Pittsburgh en los EEUU, mientras hablamos. Tal y como pueden ver en esta discusión sobre las ciudades libres (o al menos más libres) de coches, nuestra apuesta es que el futuro de la movilidad en las ciudades se debe focalizar en la gente, no en la tecnología, y que de hecho debemos “volver atrás en el futuro” cuando las calles eran consideradas como un bien público priorizando a los peatones y los ciclistas. Esta transición requerirá de un claro liderazgo por parte de los ayuntamientos y de la ciudadanía inteligente que deben requerir y participar en un futuro libre de coches para nuestras ciudades.